A Publication of the Public Library Association Public Libraries Online

Su Epstein Author Archive


Email: sepstein@columbiactlibrary.org  

Su Epstein holds a doctorate in Sociology from the University of Connecticut and began her career teaching Criminology, before changing careers to Libraryland.  She is currently the Library Director at Saxton B. Little Free Library in Columbia, CT.  Su is currently reading Odd Apocalypse by Dean Koontz.


hand in red circle indicating stop

The Value of No

Saying no does not mean being rude or mean. Sometimes saying no is necessary.

illustration of an eye

Big Brother Through the Library

On Monday April 3, 2017 President Trump signed a bill repealing internet privacy rules.

men working at computers in libraries

The Importance of Understanding and Evaluating Research

As librarians we are not only on the front line of information sharing, we are also its guardians. I believe we need to hold creators accountable. If you don’t know or understand research methods – learn them! If a source or organization will not provide or support the process, don’t support it. We need to start treating data with respect or all information will soon become meaningless.

Man selecting book from shelf in library

Amazon Books – Another Turn in the Spiral?

If you have not heard, book-selling giant Amazon currently has book*stores* in Seattle, San Francisco, and Portland with plans for more stores near Chicago and Boston. With Amazon also initiating a cashier-free grocery store, many have been speculating both why and what next.

photograph of a hand writing in a notebook

How Keeping Records Paid Off

When my library was renovated, the moving process involved notifying vendors, changing utilities, and managing our accounts. From the start, I kept copious notes of who I talked to and the content of our conversations. Here’s how it paid off.

lights

Why I Do Not Decorate the Library for Christmas

Back in January, I wrote on Leading Tolerance. Leading tolerance is moving beyond the concepts of diversity and multiculturalism and engaging in actions that demonstrate a willingness to coexist with those opinions and behaviors different from one’s own. It does not mean agreement with a differing perspective, but respect for that alternative perspective

stack of paper

The Paper Conundrum

Every day I see people in the library printing out electronic communications so they can review and have the information on paper: bank statements, emails, receipts, coupons, directions. People like paper, which brings me to a conundrum for my library.

image of emergency route red back ground white stick figure running down stairs

Don’t Forget Your Emergency Plan

Every October fire departments remind us to change our smoke detector batteries. This is the perfect time to update your emergency plan.

library sign

Librarians and Social Activism

By choice or circumstance, librarians are social activists, and with this comes responsibility.

question marks

What Makes an Expert?

An expert is generally considered someone with extensive knowledge or experience in a given area. But in today’s society of information available instantly at one’s fingertips, literally, the concept and role of the expert has shifted. Still, many people desire expert advice and actively seek out others outside their circle for confirmation or information.

arrangement of hard cover books on orange background

The Haves and The Have-Nots

With budget cuts plaguing my state, discussions have arisen over Interlibrary Loan, more specifically, the feasibility of delivering requested items from one location to another. The bottom line: This service is expensive. It is no surprise the discussion got heated and started to reflect the sometimes petty biases and politics of large groups. The conversation also reflects a fundamental divide that occurs across many competitive organizations: the divide between the haves and the have-nots.

tool box

MacGyver in the Library

This week, the children’s librarian and I were on all fours trying to secure a shelf. The little metal gadget that was supposed to fit snugly in the adjustable shelving holes had instead made the hole larger. As a result, the weight of the shelf was continually pulling the gadget out of its hole. After a brief conference, we wrapped a layer of electrical tape around the tiny nub of the gadget, increasing its size just enough for it to fit snugly. At least until we replace the book case. “We’ve MacGyvered another one,” my colleague sighed as we assessed our work. I thought, I wonder if people would see us differently if they realized how often what we do is “MacGyvering.”

person holding several moving boxes

The Top Three Challenges of Library Relocation

Due to a renovation project for some much needed building repairs, my library was forced to temporarily relocate. Our approximately 65,000-item collection was reduced to a little over 4,000 available items. We left our 4,900 square foot space to set up temporary residence in approximately 300 square feet. The transition process took four weeks. We hired a company to pack our collection for storage, but all other packing, including what we were moving or needed accessible was done by staff. We are now settled in and hope to return home in the fall.

row of brightly-colored houses

Canvassing Conundrum

I would argue that going door-to-door for any reason is an inherent danger. After all, canvassing rules say to never go inside the house, try not to be alone, and disengage immediately if you sense anything amiss. Many locations require those going door-to-door to register and carry a government ID card to identify you as legitimate Some places ban the practice altogether citing safety concerns, for both those inside the house and outside.

team

Leading Tolerance

Back when I was in school settings, first as teacher and later as librarian, I greatly adored the publication Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. When I left educational institutions and entered the public library system, my commitment to issues of diversity, equality, and justice remained strong. Over the years in the public library, I have struggled with how to continue to “teach tolerance” while not in the role of “teacher.” I have tried to pursue these values in different ways for not only the public but also for the staff and my library board. For my community, I have engaged these concepts through collection development, displays, and programming. For staff, I have provided both formal professional development opportunities and informal discussion on the distinctions between difference and danger. For the library board, I’ve crafted policy to support these values and explained the importance of being conscious of these issues and implementing policy.