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Posts Tagged ‘Children’s Books’

plane wing

EasyJet Brings Children’s Books to the Sky

Over the last summer EasyJet unveiled their “flybraries” or flying libraries, hoping to encourage young passengers to read more.

firefly award logo

And the Winner Is…

The Indiana Center of the Book recently announced Hooray for Hat! by Brian Won as the winner of the 2016 Indiana Early Literacy Firefly Award. The Indiana State Library wanted to show its commitment to early literacy and felt it was vital to have an award that celebrates reading for children ages 0–5. It modeled the Firefly Award after New Hampshire’s Ladybug Award in 2015 and gave the first award to Don’t Push the Button by Bill Cotter.

child reading

Libraries Need Diverse Books

As much as I love my local library, it has become predictable in its timing and placement of diverse books. In February, I can always count on seeing a large selection of books promoting Black History Month. Many of these titles I’ve never seen throughout the year, but because it’s Black History Month, there they all are, standing proud, front and center. The same is true for National Hispanic Month from mid-September to mid-October, Asian Pacific American month in May, and American Indian Heritage month in November. For the other eight months of the year, the displays are filled with the usual books featuring white characters or happy-friendly animals.

St. Paul Public Library Publishes Picture Books

The St. Paul Public Library in Minnesota is proving that the public library is one of the most valuable places in town, especially for an under-represented immigrant population — the Karen. In December, mayor Chris Coleman announced that the library had curated and published two Karen language children’s books, which were then handed out at a special book launch and read at a December storytime.

Duncan Tonatiuh Author Photo

Ancient and Contemporary: A Conversation with Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh’s evocative and charming picture books have been staples of the bestseller list since his debut book, Dear Primo: Letters to My Cousin, in 2010. Since then he’s written and illustrated Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote: A Migrant’s Tale, Diego Rivera: His World And Ours, and Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation. His most recent book, Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras, details the life of José Guadalupe (Lupe) Posada, the Mexican artist whose calaveras (skeletons performing everyday tasks) have become a ubiquitous presence in Day of the Dead celebrations. The book was named a 2016 Sibert Award Winner, Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Honor Book, and a New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Books of 2015. Duncan Tonatiuh talked with Brendan Dowling via telephone on January 26th, 2015. The following is an edited version of their conversation.

sept oct public libraries feature article

Just Good Practice: Engaging Families with Young Children

Books can open doorways to discovery. PerfectPiggies! (2010) by Sandra Boynton, for example, delights babies and toddlers with quirky fun and
upbeat illustrations—and helps grown-ups interact with children. “Isn’t that pig silly? What do you think will happen next?” Adults learn to relax and enjoy the “conversation”—”bah doo bah doink.” Parents can invite story connections to personal life. “A piggy needs kindness. Wasn’t Grandma kind to bring us flowers yesterday?” A well-chosen book and a suggested home activity help parents create a heart-to-heart intimacy with their child. Library play-and-learn centers magnetically draw children into the kind of play that engages and inspires them. Grown-ups and children—by talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing—can enter into this world of discovery.

children's books at a library

Observations from Serving on a Children’s Book Award Committee

I’ve been a children’s librarian for almost seventeen years, but 2014 was the first time I participated in a book award committee. While the award might not be as well-known as the Newbery–publishers were not inclined to print our potential choices in paperback just because we were going to select them as nominees- our committee nevertheless had a daunting task.

granny reading with kids

Scholastic Publishes Fifth Edition of Kids & Family Reading Report

Scholastic has published the fifth edition of its popular Kids & Family Reading Report, the results of a survey conducted in conjunction with YouGov that gauges how children and their parents view reading in their daily lives.[1] The organizations polled over 2,500 respondents, representing ages 0-17, in late 2014. Questions ranged from the importance and frequency of reading for pleasure, what makes a “frequent” reader, where kids are reading, and what kids are looking for when selecting books.

colorful handprints

“We Need Diverse Books” Campaign Gaining Momentum

If you work with children’s books and go online, there’s no way you can miss the colorful logo of the “We Need Diverse Books” (WNDB) campaign, which launched in 2014. What started as a tweet between creators Malinda Lo and Ellen Oh has turned into a grassroots movement that has bloggers, authors, librarians, and publishers getting involved and addressing the need for diverse characters and narratives in children’s literature.

Girl reading

Smart Start Community Outreach

Recently I attended an American Libraries webinar on The Future of Libraries. Among the many topics that were discussed was the idea that libraries need to get out of the stacks and into the community. Many libraries already support organizations within the community, whether it’s through hosting events or posting informational pamphlets about these local organizations. However this idea explores how the library can leave the building and help the community.

television remote control

Seen on TV – A Popular Genre

Does the phrase “As Seen on TV” make you think of late night infomercials and gadgets that never work quite right? In the library, it can mean circulation gold!

gemstones

Hidden Gems – Five Lesser-Known Periodicals for Your Collection

As budgets shrink, the quest for quality grows. A while ago my library surveyed patrons about their preferences and how they wanted to see materials collections develop. One item that arose much to my surprise was the request for hard copy periodicals “with substance.” The food and craft titles were fine, but people commented they wanted to see less gossip and more content.

Colorful music score

Librarians Getting Ready to Read with the Rhythm

Get out your guitar, ukulele, maracas, and tambourine! Winter has just begun, but librarians across the country are choreographing their “Read to the Rhythm” summer.

Library Kids

Can Children See Themselves in the Books on Your Shelves? Part II

Children look for themselves in the books that they read. Libraries need to have books that represent the rainbow of diverse cultures that are in our communities. Books that promote diversity should be celebrated every day, not just on holidays.

Library Kids

Can Children See Themselves in the Books on Your Shelves? Part I

Children look for themselves in the books that they read. Libraries need to have books that represent the rainbow of diverse cultures that are in our communities. Books that promote diversity should be celebrated every day, not just on holidays.