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Posts Tagged ‘early literacy’

Children reading

How To Raise a Reader

The editors at The New York Times Book Review, a weekly paper magazine, created a wonderful guide for parents looking for that answer, “How to Raise a Reader.” Editor Pamela Paul, and Children’s Book Editor Maria Russo offer easy-to-follow steps for parents and caregivers as well numerous book recommendations for ages birth-teen. The guide also features fun illustrations by Dan Yaccarino to bring it to life (much like illustrations in children’s books). Russo said the spirit of the guide is “encourage your children to read all kinds of books, in all kinds of places, and to talk about them and share their enthusiasm.”

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Closes the 2017 ALA Annual Conference

Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke to more than 3,000 people on the final day of the 2017 ALA Annual Conference. “Democracy and libraries go hand in hand,” she told the crowd, which erupted in applause.

illustration of person reading

Reading Is in Decline: If Not You, Then Who?

To foster a long-lasting love of reading in a child, it is critical to get their parents’ involvement. By taking a two-generation approach libraries can provide opportunities for and meet the needs of children and their parents together.

PERSPECTIVES | Literacy and Parents

This column represents the final mining of a batch of submissions about establishing and revivifying the habit of literacy. Our contributors swing through a graceful arc, beginning with a thorough, best practices approach to early literacy, and extending even unto that dark, dark land of adulthood.

girl using large reference book

Teach Effective Research Skills Early

Although I am a “younger” librarian, I do remember learning the tools for researching and writing a paper in high school. In fact, we had to write and research a topic in order to graduate high school. As students we had to compile sources by searching through the card catalog, and then we had to locate the physical books in the stacks. It was by doing this that we learned how to use indexes, how to create a ‘Works Cited’ page, how to sift through information on an assigned topic, and how to use the card catalogs. We did not have to worry about the quality of the research on our desired topics.

Library of Congress Literacy Awards 2015: Best Practices

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards Program has released their third annual Best Practices publication. Along with the three previously announced 2015 prize winners, fourteen other organizations presenting paramount methods for increasing literacy are included in the publication. The Literacy Awards, first announced in January 2013, honor organizations that successfully increase literacy in the United States or abroad. The Literacy Awards also promote the distribution of the most effective methods, and the Best Practices publication is a key component in sharing these innovative ideas. Below are just a few of the programs cited for their exemplary work in the categories of best practices.

sept oct public libraries feature article

Just Good Practice: Engaging Families with Young Children

Books can open doorways to discovery. PerfectPiggies! (2010) by Sandra Boynton, for example, delights babies and toddlers with quirky fun and
upbeat illustrations—and helps grown-ups interact with children. “Isn’t that pig silly? What do you think will happen next?” Adults learn to relax and enjoy the “conversation”—”bah doo bah doink.” Parents can invite story connections to personal life. “A piggy needs kindness. Wasn’t Grandma kind to bring us flowers yesterday?” A well-chosen book and a suggested home activity help parents create a heart-to-heart intimacy with their child. Library play-and-learn centers magnetically draw children into the kind of play that engages and inspires them. Grown-ups and children—by talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing—can enter into this world of discovery.

writing

NaNoWriMo a Great Way to Teach Literacy

It’s easy to engage young readers. Librarians do it all the time with reading programs and story hours. Yet how can those in the library profession engage older readers? By encouraging them to write their own stories. The month of November is perfect for integrating writing into library literacy programs: it’s National Novel Writing Month!

granny reading with kids

Scholastic Publishes Fifth Edition of Kids & Family Reading Report

Scholastic has published the fifth edition of its popular Kids & Family Reading Report, the results of a survey conducted in conjunction with YouGov that gauges how children and their parents view reading in their daily lives.[1] The organizations polled over 2,500 respondents, representing ages 0-17, in late 2014. Questions ranged from the importance and frequency of reading for pleasure, what makes a “frequent” reader, where kids are reading, and what kids are looking for when selecting books.

Child reading

One Book 4 Colorado: Free Books for Early Literacy

In April 2015, the One Book 4 Colorado program gave away its selected title to four year-olds across the state for the fourth time since its beginning in 2012. This year’s selection was How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? by Jane Yolen.  Over 70,000 books in English and Spanish were given away in libraries, preschools, […]

Girl reading

Smart Start Community Outreach

Recently I attended an American Libraries webinar on The Future of Libraries. Among the many topics that were discussed was the idea that libraries need to get out of the stacks and into the community. Many libraries already support organizations within the community, whether it’s through hosting events or posting informational pamphlets about these local organizations. However this idea explores how the library can leave the building and help the community.

Babies in the Library: Creating a Truly Baby-Friendly Early Literacy Play Space

Of course babies are welcome in the public library! Or are they? The benefits of a literacy-rich environment for babies and toddlers are well documented, and the library is a go-to place for families with young children.1 But the actual presence of babies and toddlers in the library creates unique challenges for everyone. We often see babies kept in restraining seats due to a lack of alternatives and, after a reasonable amount of time, they voice their complaints loudly. Often, new mothers find the idea of entering a library a bit daunting. After all, babies can be unpredictable, disruptive, and just plain noisy. Staff members are all too familiar with managing unsupervised toddlers while adult caregivers are preoccupied with computer-related tasks, and with fielding complaints from less tolerant adult patrons. The little ones themselves don’t really have a place of their own to just be themselves while in the library. These are just a few of the problems we’ve identified when considering how to truly accept and welcome babies and their caregivers in the library.

ecrr logo

ECRR2 + Advocacy = Big Win!

This past January, Every Child Ready to Read @ your library, 2nd edition, nabbed the top prize at the 2014 Opening Minds Innovation Awards in Chicago. This is huge news for public libraries and children’s librarians everywhere, so grab your egg shakers and celebrate!

reading to baby

Imagination Library Spreads the Love of Reading

Spreading the love of reading can happen in numerous ways. Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library provides a wonderful method to help instill this enjoyment in young children.