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Posts Tagged ‘education’

Children reading

How To Raise a Reader

The editors at The New York Times Book Review, a weekly paper magazine, created a wonderful guide for parents looking for that answer, “How to Raise a Reader.” Editor Pamela Paul, and Children’s Book Editor Maria Russo offer easy-to-follow steps for parents and caregivers as well numerous book recommendations for ages birth-teen. The guide also features fun illustrations by Dan Yaccarino to bring it to life (much like illustrations in children’s books). Russo said the spirit of the guide is “encourage your children to read all kinds of books, in all kinds of places, and to talk about them and share their enthusiasm.”

a laptop and a stack of books

Online Education: Connected or Disconnected?

Online coursework is becoming more prevalent across higher education, and this is especially the case in MLIS programs. When I began working towards my master’s in 2011, online programs were already popular; now, they seem even more ubiquitous. A recent article in Slate, “An Online Education Disconnect” by Rachael Cusick, explores the pros and cons of this type of study, which inspired me to explore my own thoughts as well.

children

Using Programming to Bridge Library and School

For years public libraries have provided summer reading programs, school reading lists and collections, conferences, clubs, and other educational, entertainment, and informational events for school age children. The purpose of this article is to provide a variety of examples of programs that are an easy way to facilitate learning while making studying enjoyable.

painting on stain glass rose

STEM Without Flowers is Pretty Bleak

For a while we have heard a great deal about STEM. STEM is a curriculum based on the idea of educating students in four specific disciplines: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. This focus has understandably trickled down to the public library. While I support and see the value in the STEM disciplines, I must point out that a stem without flowers is pretty bleak. It is only through diverse and well-rounded education that true advancement can be made. Aesthetic and creative disciplines are as valuable as science and math. A liberal arts education still has value. It concerns me that as a culture we seem to be abandoning humanities and arts for science and technology, rather than trying to maintain a healthy balance.