A Publication of the Public Library Association Public Libraries Online

Posts Tagged ‘staff communication’

people around table meeting

Library Directors Group Enables Collaboration and Learning

The support from the community of library directors is one that I value greatly and am thankful to have.

hand in red circle indicating stop

The Value of No

Saying no does not mean being rude or mean. Sometimes saying no is necessary.

Net Neutrality

Welcoming Unwelcome News

Some news is easy to share. Some isn’t.

Two male hands in a handshake

Talk the Talk

It is the leader’s responsibility to guide the organizational conversation to improve its internal and external performance. This means that when you speak with an employee he/she should be able to tell you the mission, strategy, and goals of the library and be able to talk about their role within the organization. Surely you’ve heard the story of the NASA janitor who said his job was to “send people to the moon.” Everyone has a role, and the intentionality of a conversation can lead to real breakthroughs. How can we be intentional in our conversations at work?

thought cloud and exclamation point

Leaks or Bursts: Managing Feelings in Workplace Communication

In this post (the second in a series) I am focusing on communication via the book Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss what Matters Most  by Stone, Patton, and Heen. The authors do an incredible job of breaking down the elements of difficult conversations and offer some very practical steps on how to approach all types […]

business people

Dress Codes at the Library

I was at a recent gathering of library directors where the subject of dress codes arose. Our policies weren’t very different, but our personal views about what is acceptable for staff and administration were almost as varied as our zip codes. Most policies considered the work being performed. Pages have to bend, stretch, climb up, […]

stick figures representing cooperation

Millennials Among Us

“The Millennials are coming! The Millennials are coming!” Perhaps you heard the hue and cry? Since the early 2000s, market research about the Millennials—also referred to as either the Next Generation, the Echo Boomers, the Y Generation, or the Generation Why?—has filled business and professional magazines, in print and online, delineating who they are, what they believe, how to manage them, and, most importantly, how to survive their incursion. These individuals, who were born in the early 80s to 2000—depending on which source I consulted—are further divided into the Digital Immigrants (those who learned technology at some point early in their lives), the Digital Natives (who since birth never knew a day without technology and social media), and the Millennials’ most recent members—as of yet not nicknamed—who know only smartphones, mobile apps, and who live in the iCloud.

Woman holding manager sign

It Takes More Than a Trust Fall: Establishing a Great Management Team

For this first blog post I want to focus on the issue of building trust. Lencioni addresses this in his book The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business. According to Lencioni, before you can get healthy as an organization, you need to establish a strong team. To establish a strong team, you must establish trust.

library with fiction books

Separate or Keep Together?

Many book stores separate fiction into genres. Some libraries do it too. Should you?

Feature Article

Low-Hanging Fruit: Learning How to Improve Customer Service, Staff Communication, and Job Satisfaction with Process Improvement

Process improvement has become an axiom in the business world recently. Discussions of process improvement methodologies such as Six Sigma and Lean have become commonplace in both business and public service board rooms. In 2014, the Pierce County (WA) Library System (PCLS) began conducting something of an experiment, working to discover if it is possible for a midsize public library without the resources of General Electric or Toyota to implement process improvement techniques in a real-world environment. We are, at present, about halfway through the work of our first process improvement team, but we’ve already begun to see exciting results.