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Posts Tagged ‘print books’

row of books

Don’t Panic, Print Books Aren’t Going Anywhere

Our world is inundated with digital technology: mobile phones, laptops, iPads, smart cars, smart homes… The entirety of human knowledge is at our fingertips. The Internet revolutionized how we access information. It wasn’t long before people began to predict that the elimination of print was on the horizon. After all, when the Amazon Kindle was […]

Man selecting book from shelf in library

Amazon Books – Another Turn in the Spiral?

If you have not heard, book-selling giant Amazon currently has book*stores* in Seattle, San Francisco, and Portland with plans for more stores near Chicago and Boston. With Amazon also initiating a cashier-free grocery store, many have been speculating both why and what next.

kindle

E-book Trends Flattening, Paper Books Holding Their Own

Trends are showing a flattening of the e-book explosion. According to the Association of American Publishers, e-book sales fell by 11 percent through third quarter 2015.[1] Five years ago, experts predicted e-book sales becoming 50 percent of book sale market.[2] They also predicted that the sales of e-books through online retailers would cause brick-and-mortar stores to decline.[3] While e-book sales did increase exponentially, we have a seen a flattening of this trend. Even the marketplace is beginning to demonstrate physical presence has its place. Online-only retailer Amazon has made the move to expand into the brick-and-mortar market.[4]

Woman reading a book on the beach

Digital Natives Prefer Print

Many assumptions have been made about the fate of print books, and how e-books and our increasingly digital world will change the way people read and study. We all love the convenience and space-saving qualities of e-books, as well as the fun devices they live on. However, a Washington Post article from February discussed something unexpected: the fact that most college-aged students, often called “millennials” or “digital natives,” prefer reading print books.