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Posts Tagged ‘libraries and net neutrality’

yield road sign that says net neutrality background of small white padlocks

Net Neutrality is Dead. For Now.

While this is a huge change that could endanger equal access to the internet, the American Library Association (and other organizations) continue to press for a restoration of Net Neutrality laws.

January/February The Wired Library

Towards a Framework for Digital Justice in Public Libraries

In the wake of the net neutrality repeal, now more than ever, public libraries need to rise to the challenge of engaging in digital justice work. As librarians, we know that the repeal of net neutrality hurts all of us. However, in a climate of increasing inequality and opportunity gaps, marginalized communities, especially people of color, low-income households, and rural communities, are primed to be most negatively impacted by the FCC’s egregious party-line decision.

silver and white keyboard

DRM Still Coming to the HTML

In March, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) threw out a nonaggression covenant that would safeguard people from some of the legal risk associated with building DRM (digital rights management) into the open web. This means that the charter for the HTML Media Extensions Working Group—which oversees the Encrypted Media Extensions specification—has been extended through September 2016.

FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted yesterday to assert the strongest possible open Internet protections—banning paid prioritization and the blocking and throttling of lawful content and services. The American Library Association (ALA), a longtime network neutrality advocate, applauds this bold step forward in ensuring a fair and open Internet.

Taking Sides on Net Neutrality

Last week, a U.S. court of appeals put the kibosh on regulations that keep the Internet playing field even. Broadband providers think it’s awesome. Consumer advocates say, “No way.” So what’s a librarian to do? Oh, plenty.