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Posts Tagged ‘early literacy activities’

Public Libraries Feature Article

Reading Confidence with Tail Waggin’ Tutors

Children who participate in canine-assisted reading programs are likely to develop confidence in their reading skills and find reading to be more enjoyable. While there has not yet been an extensive amount of data to be found to prove the effectiveness of children reading to therapy dogs at drop-in library programs, a research study conducted by the Davis Veterinary Medicine Extension at the University of California found that school children who read to therapy dogs on a regular basis improve their reading fluency by 12 percent. Studies that are available on canine-assisted library reading programs have found results for improvements in oral reading fluency and accuracy, along with significant increases in engaged reading time and significant improvements in reading skills, such as the ability to explain, describe, analyze, and infer.

PERSPECTIVES | Literacy and Parents

This column represents the final mining of a batch of submissions about establishing and revivifying the habit of literacy. Our contributors swing through a graceful arc, beginning with a thorough, best practices approach to early literacy, and extending even unto that dark, dark land of adulthood.

two hands holding a phone

Brooklyn Public Library’s Ready, Set, Kindergarten! Texting Initiative

Brooklyn Public Library promotes early childhood literacy through “Ready, Set, Kindergarten (RSK) on the Go!” a texting campaign that complements BPL’s face-to-face early literacy program, “Ready, Set, Kindergarten!”

story time

The Hottest Show In Town: Storytime @ your library

What’s happening when The New York Times has been reporting queues as long as those for hot Broadway shows like Hamilton? And there are lines circling city blocks for hours waiting for tickets for first-come, first-serve seats? What’s happening? Storytime at one of New York City’s many public libraries. Library storytimes have been drawing record crowds in New York City and around the country since the White House released its report, Empowering Our Children—Bridging the Word Gap, in June 2014.

Man Up: Attracting the Male Patron

Do you really want more boys and men in your libraries? Of course you do! Libraries are for everyone. So, if your library suffers from low-t then jumpstart your bro-grams and soon it will be “raining men” inside your library—everything from events that draw them in to the collection that keeps them coming back. What does your library need to attract men of all ages?

close up of dog

Kids Reading to Dogs in Libraries

The purpose of a reading to dogs program is to provide children with a comfortable environment to practice their reading skills. In an interview with ABC, Francine Alexander, the chief academic officer for Scholastic, mentions that it is often easier for children to read aloud to dogs than in front of classmates because there is no embarrassment if mistakes occur. In 2010, the University of California-Davis completed a study on reading to dog programs, which suggested that children who read to dogs improved their own reading skills in comparison to children who did not read to dogs, based on the results of the Oral Text Reading for Comprehension Test. The program involved reading to dogs once a week for ten weeks. Children who read to dogs also reported a greater enjoyment of reading than children who did not read to dogs.

sept oct public libraries feature article

Just Good Practice: Engaging Families with Young Children

Books can open doorways to discovery. PerfectPiggies! (2010) by Sandra Boynton, for example, delights babies and toddlers with quirky fun and
upbeat illustrations—and helps grown-ups interact with children. “Isn’t that pig silly? What do you think will happen next?” Adults learn to relax and enjoy the “conversation”—”bah doo bah doink.” Parents can invite story connections to personal life. “A piggy needs kindness. Wasn’t Grandma kind to bring us flowers yesterday?” A well-chosen book and a suggested home activity help parents create a heart-to-heart intimacy with their child. Library play-and-learn centers magnetically draw children into the kind of play that engages and inspires them. Grown-ups and children—by talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing—can enter into this world of discovery.

writing

NaNoWriMo a Great Way to Teach Literacy

It’s easy to engage young readers. Librarians do it all the time with reading programs and story hours. Yet how can those in the library profession engage older readers? By encouraging them to write their own stories. The month of November is perfect for integrating writing into library literacy programs: it’s National Novel Writing Month!

granny reading with kids

Scholastic Publishes Fifth Edition of Kids & Family Reading Report

Scholastic has published the fifth edition of its popular Kids & Family Reading Report, the results of a survey conducted in conjunction with YouGov that gauges how children and their parents view reading in their daily lives.[1] The organizations polled over 2,500 respondents, representing ages 0-17, in late 2014. Questions ranged from the importance and frequency of reading for pleasure, what makes a “frequent” reader, where kids are reading, and what kids are looking for when selecting books.

Child reading

One Book 4 Colorado: Free Books for Early Literacy

In April 2015, the One Book 4 Colorado program gave away its selected title to four year-olds across the state for the fourth time since its beginning in 2012. This year’s selection was How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? by Jane Yolen.  Over 70,000 books in English and Spanish were given away in libraries, preschools, […]

Babies in the Library: Creating a Truly Baby-Friendly Early Literacy Play Space

Of course babies are welcome in the public library! Or are they? The benefits of a literacy-rich environment for babies and toddlers are well documented, and the library is a go-to place for families with young children.1 But the actual presence of babies and toddlers in the library creates unique challenges for everyone. We often see babies kept in restraining seats due to a lack of alternatives and, after a reasonable amount of time, they voice their complaints loudly. Often, new mothers find the idea of entering a library a bit daunting. After all, babies can be unpredictable, disruptive, and just plain noisy. Staff members are all too familiar with managing unsupervised toddlers while adult caregivers are preoccupied with computer-related tasks, and with fielding complaints from less tolerant adult patrons. The little ones themselves don’t really have a place of their own to just be themselves while in the library. These are just a few of the problems we’ve identified when considering how to truly accept and welcome babies and their caregivers in the library.

dignitaries at anniversary celebration of Storyville

Providing New and Innovative Children’s Services Helps to Keep Libraries Relevant

Earlier this spring, elected officials, library supporters, and families and children from throughout the Baltimore metropolitan area gathered at the Rosedale Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library (BCPL) to recognize an important milestone. Storyville, an interactive early literacy learning center located within this library, celebrated its fifth birthday.