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Posts Tagged ‘open internet’

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Reaching Across the Digital Divide

A recent New York Times article by Cecilia Kang profiled a Detroit, Michigan, community struggling with Internet access. The article highlights how residents without broadband access struggle to participate in Detroit’s economic recovery and reports that “Detroit has the worst rate of Internet access of any big American city, with four in ten of its 689,000 residents lacking broadband, according to the Federal Communications Commission.”

silver and white keyboard

DRM Still Coming to the HTML

In March, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) threw out a nonaggression covenant that would safeguard people from some of the legal risk associated with building DRM (digital rights management) into the open web. This means that the charter for the HTML Media Extensions Working Group—which oversees the Encrypted Media Extensions specification—has been extended through September 2016.

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The Dangers of Internet Filtering

So you are at your public library about to download or view information for a research paper, and then it happens: The library’s blocking software lets you know that you are not allowed to access a certain webpage because it has been filtered out by the network’s firewall. You are immediately disappointed because you know the information you are trying to access is harmless and poses no threat to minors; however, according to the library’s firewall, the webpage has been categorized as “adult,” allowing you no access to the page. This is not only a disappointment but also a disservice to many students who are simply trying to access informational resources.

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Open Internet Order Now Effective

The FCC recently passed the Open Internet Order, which became active on June 12, 2015. ALA has overwhelmingly expressed its support for the legislation that protects and promotes the open internet. In fact, ALA and its coalition with 137 other groups and companies wrote a letter thanking FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, and Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel for their leadership in protecting the Open Internet. Because of the coalition’s strong and persuasive voice, the ruling references the coalition’s ideas and proposals nearly 20 times.

FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted yesterday to assert the strongest possible open Internet protections—banning paid prioritization and the blocking and throttling of lawful content and services. The American Library Association (ALA), a longtime network neutrality advocate, applauds this bold step forward in ensuring a fair and open Internet.