A Publication of the Public Library Association Public Libraries Online

Posts Tagged ‘summer programming’

story time

School Libraries in Baltimore Don’t Take a Summer Vacation

Even when school is out for the summer, some school libraries in Baltimore are open for business, providing books, activities, and meals to hundreds of Baltimore City students.

Summer Volunteer Squad Offers Creative Options

Volunteering during the summer doesn’t have to be all about the summer reading programs or getting all of the library’s books in perfect alphabetical order. At the Arlington Heights Memorial Library in Illinois, teens and staff alike get to show off a variety of skills in the Summer Volunteer Squad program. The Summer Volunteer Squad was created to give the library’s many teen volunteers the opportunity to volunteer meaningfully during their summer breaks. The program was modeled after a similar program at the nearby Oak Park (IL) Library.

Range app screenshot

How Range Can Help Libraries Connect Kids to Summer Meals

Public libraries are starting to play a larger role as a referrer of community health and social services. Many larger public library systems (such as Washington, D.C. and San Francisco) are adding social workers to their employee roster. In a recent TechSoup for Libraries and WebJunction co-hosted webinar, we examined social service referral programs from three libraries of varying sizes. And at ALA 2015, WebJunction showcased its Health Happens in Libraries program along with five library participants at a poster session.

But for libraries that don’t have the budget or staffing to develop a robust social services or meal program, a tool like Range is an easy (and free!) way to get started. One librarian I spoke with said that she posted a flier about Range on her library’s community bulletin board. She said that although they don’t get a lot of questions about social services, there is a high poverty rate in her community. She thought that posting Range’s information could help a family in need if they were too afraid to ask.

street sign Library Lane

KEEP CALM AND LIBRARY ON: Avoiding Summer Burnout

Summertime can be pretty overwhelming in a public library, even if you don’t work in youth services. Thanks to an increase in unstructured time, the library becomes a popular place for students and their families. At my library, we also see an uptick in usage from residents who do not have school-age children and come in to stock up on books and media before heading off on vacation. While the rest of the world is getting the chance to relax, we’re kicking it into high gear in order to provide the best possible service for our patrons.

Geek Girl Camp circuits class

Geek Girls Camp at the Library

The Fayetteville Free Library’s week-long Geek Girl Camp gives elementary-age girls the opportunity to learn and play in various STEAM fields all in one location – the library!

Colorful music score

Librarians Getting Ready to Read with the Rhythm

Get out your guitar, ukulele, maracas, and tambourine! Winter has just begun, but librarians across the country are choreographing their “Read to the Rhythm” summer.

Summer Reading

Summer Slump

You’ve heard of “summer slide” with children and their reading levels. But let’s talk about summer slump when your staff are exhausted and can barely go on, but summer programs are just beginning.

Summer Reading

Summer Reading Program: Purposeful Fun

It is easy to fall into the busy summer routine without thinking about why we, as public libraries, dedicate so much staff time and resources to this activity each year.

hiking symbol

Taking the Library Outdoors

Most people do not connect the library with outdoor recreation. While we often hear how everyone likes to read outside, the library tends to be thought of mainly as an indoor activity. We promote many things at the library, and outdoor recreation can be just another aspect of helping to enrich our community. A few years ago consultants who were working with us at the Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) in Colorado, pointed out that we weren’t addressing the popularity of the variety of outside activities that our community enjoys.